#Shared_Planet

We share one planet that establishes the foundations of our lives in all its facets and diversity. There is substantial evidence that we are approaching several crucial boundaries of this planet, beyond which humanity runs the risk to leave a safe and just operating space. Examples of related challenges are climate change, biodiversity loss or social tensions fuelled by the in-just distribution of wealth and resources.  Facing these challenges, the world community has agreed upon 17 Sustainable Development Goals as part of the Agenda 2030 as shared guideline for policy making and action on all levels.  For reaching these goals different form of sharing can and should play an essential role ranging from sharing of resources and products to sharing of ideals, experiences and knowledge both on a local and on a global level. Thus, the question is how we can and want to share for a common future rather than if we want to share or not.

Sin­ce Ja­nu­a­ry 2010 Da­ni­el J. Lang is Pro­fes­sor for Tran­di­sci­pli­na­ry Sustaina­bi­li­ty Re­se­arch at Leu­pha­na Uni­ver­si­ty of Lu­e­n­e­burg, Ger­ma­ny, at the Fa­cul­ty of Sustaina­bi­li­ty. The main fo­cus of Da­ni­el’s work re­vol­ves around the fur­ther de­ve­lop­ment of the theo­re­ti­cal, me­tho­do­lo­gi­cal as well as pro­cess-re­la­ted foun­da­ti­ons of Sustaina­bi­li­ty Sci­ence. In par­ti­cu­lar his pro­fes­sor­ship fo­cu­ses on co­ope­ra­ti­on and mu­tu­al learning pro­ces­ses bet­ween dif­fe­rent sci­en­ti­fic di­sci­pli­nes as well as sci­ence and so­cie­ty with the aim to de­ve­lop ro­bust so­lu­ti­on op­ti­ons for ur­gent sustaina­bi­li­ty pro­blems of the 21st cen­tu­ry. 

Here you can find all project themes which belong to #SharedPlanet. Please scroll further down to see all themes and advisors.

A business fit for 2023

Degrowth and Germany’s ‘fair share’ of the global economy

Description

The idea of degrowth – an equitable downscaling of production and consumption that increases human well-being and enhances ecological conditions at the local and global level (Schneider et al. 2010) –sits within a larger topic of sustainable resource use. However, the relations between degrowth and equitable resource use remain unclear. In this project we will explore questions related to Germany’s ‘fair share’ of global resource, this might include: What constitutes a ‘fair share’ of resources for a degrowth economy? How can work be shared in a fair degrowth economy? Is happiness dependent of resource use?

Advisor

I am junior professor of sustainability economics in the Faculty of Sustainability at Leuphana University. My research interests are relatively broad but are largely focused on system thinking approaches to understanding the intersection between economic activity, human well-being, biodiversity conservation and sustainable resource use. Much of my research is focused around agricultural/land use sustainability.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

The way in which resources are appropriated and distributed in our globalised economic system is often deeply unfair and ecologically unsustainable. By revealing these unequitable and unsustainable economic relations – often hidden by the complexity of the economic system and the distance between resource consumption and the social and environmental impacts of that consumption — we can start to explore sustainable economies based on notions of a ‘fair share’.   

 

Designing a world that addresses the challenges of our times

Description

The systems that drive our world are failing to address the biggest challenges of our times. In fact they appear to create larger challenges for the future. Each group should choose a global or local challenge and examine if it is the result of any defect of the system we have designed, or a failure of those who are to manage the problems in the system. Each group will then produce their vision of a system where the challenge would not exist.

Advisor

As a Professor of Decision Sciences and Governance of Complex Systems, Anupam Saraph mentors students and teaches systems, information systems, environmental systems and sustainable development at universities in Europe, Asia and the Americas. Dr. Saraph also works with leaders of states, industry and academia to help them address their toughest challenges, accomplish missions and achieve business goal. He has done pioneering work on designing urban nervous systems for smart cities, digital governance innovations, educational reforms, and designing sustainable and resilient organisations. Dr Saraph is also actively engaged in civil society where he participates in several environmental, resource and nature conservation initiatives, has authored draft legislations for river and natural resource conservation, right to good governance and has contributed to election and democratic reforms. Dr. Saraph is a regular columnist in newspapers and writes on issues of governance, future design, technology and education from a systems perspective.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

We share a common environment for our planet. Its bio-geo-chemical cycles ensure this environment can continue to support us and the life on our planet. A globalized world is focused on exploiting the biological, geological or chemical resources across the planet in a bid to increase the economic activity for increasingly material and energy intensive lifestyles. Sharing in a globalized world has replaced our sharing our environment with sharing the faster exploitation of our resources to further our ever increasing material and energy needs. In a globalized world, we have lost the wisdom of recognizing and protecting our shared environment and its bio-geo-chemical cycles. Our globalized world needs to reinvent its material and energy systems to work within the bio-geo-chemical cycles that allow us to sustain a resilient and shared environment.

Education for sustainable development - is sharing knowledge a key for sustainability transformation?

Description

If we think of most of our time in school, it was about learning the right things. However, what are, in our globalized world with more information and knowledge accessible than ever before, the right things? Sharing knowledge and competence is nowadays an issue of the internet, learning with YouTube videos for example is quite widespread practice. What can provide school as an alternative? How could learning or “Bildung” look like that prepares young people for something that we do not really know yet? During the group work we will have a look on different perspectives on these questions from different parts of the world.

Advisor

I am educationalist and by training secondary school teacher. Since 2015, I am Postdoc at the Institute for Integrative Studies (head Matthias Barth). My research interests are education for sustainable development, global education in teacher education and professional development, learning and reflection in transformation processes as well as migration and refugees as issues of ESD and transformation impulse (related to this inclusion and ESD). At the same time, I am senior researcher and coordinator of the research program “Processes of Sustainability Transformation” since 2017, in which I am responsible for supporting 12 PhD students. My teaching is mostly in the master program for primary school teacher students. My doctor thesis (Goethe University Frankfurt) focused on the competence development of students in dealing with global, complex issues.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

“Sharing in a globalized world” means to me personally that we need to rethink and restructure our thinking about education and the related institutions. Knowledge and information is accessible as never before and the formats of sharing it are manifold. So perhaps it is more the question of how we organize and think about sharing of knowledge? I believe that finding the right ways of sharing and connecting the various forms of knowledge helps us to foster a transformation towards sustainability. 

How to share goods in a globalized world? - political principles and social approaches

Description

To share something is a solidary principle and is demanded to keep social communities stable. There are concrete ideas how to organize the utilization of common goods as f.ex. the atmosphere in a fair way as well as more private ways to share globally goods and capacities. What kind of sharing principles do you already know? What do you consider as important institutionalized or noninstitutionalized ways of sharing to create and implement a sustainable lifestyle or, in case it already exists, keep it alive?

Advisor

I am Christine Heybl, I studied philosophy, biology and ethnology in Potsdam and Berlin. Furthermore, I wrote a thesis about climate justice based on the moral theory of Immanuel Kant. Now I am very interested in organic agriculture and permaculture as well as in sustainable lifestyles as transition towns. 

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

‘Sharing in a globalized world’ means to me personally that we are open to this way of using goods or giving and getting access to knowledge. There exists a big variety of websites which offer exchanges and ways to share globally like ‘couchsurfing’, ‘wwoof’, ‘helpX’ and much more. In my opinion, we have to be open-minded and courageous to use these alternative ways of exchange without money and we will inadvertently recognize that this kind of sharing has a lot of benefits.

Overcoming Distances in International Food Supply to Foster Sustainability

Description

International food supply is often associated with negative externalities including injustices across the economic value chain, significant transport-related greenhouse gas emissions, as well as unfavorable working conditions. Large distances are relevant proxies for this situation, specifically, large geographical and relational distances. So far, little attention has been paid to emerging entrepreneurs that aim at overcoming these large distances to advance sustainability of food supplies. We will look into evidence-based solutions, for example in the coffee sector, on how to foster sustainable food supply through overcoming large distances.

Advisor

Hanna Weber is a Ph.D. student at Leuphana University of Lüneburg and part of the “Processes of Sustainability Transformation” program. She researches how to infuse strong sustainability into the international supply chains of local food businesses, with a fo­cus on Ger­ma­ny, Me­xi­co, and the USA. Hanna has previously worked at Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome, Italy, where she developed her great interest in sustainable agricultural and food systems. She holds a Master in Sustainability Science (M.Sc.) from Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

“Sharing in a Globalized World,”  for me, means to create solidary relationships between humans while respecting nature.

 

Re-designing an ecological future – the human footprint as key to sustainability

Description

Ironically the ongoing eco-debate is constructing an image of humanity where people are seen as part of the problem – but never as part of the solution. A sustainable person according to that logic is one, who not even exists and therefore tends to be ‘climate neutral’. The Cradle-To-Cradle approach, however, invites people to contribute to a healthy human footprint, with intelligent product design, which is not only ‘less harmful’ but even beneficial for the environment and its inhabitants of all the various forms. Students are welcome to contribute and learn how to use human creativity and productivity to find solutions for the key aspects and challenges of our planet’s future.

Advisor

Professor Michael Braungart is the co-founder of Cradle To Cradle, a design principle for creating products with positive ecological impact. In his work, he inspires people all over the world to contribute to a healthy human footprint. At Leuphana University he is Professor for Eco-Design and Eco-Effectiveness.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

For me, this means to start doing the rights things properly instead of doing the wrong things more efficiently.

 

Share – Health – Care – Knowledge: On the relations between health, globalization and knowledge.

Description

"Health" is not only the central focus of the WHO but also one of the 17 global goals: All people worldwide should have access to "healthy lifestyles, preventive measures and modern, efficient healthcare". But what is health? And can this question – in view of sick and dying people – even be asked? In our society, "health" is virtually omnipresent and partly represented with religious fervor. It is not only the focus of medicine and the pharmaceutical industry, but also of politics, the economy and various other disciplines and social areas. So, who is responsible for "the knowledge" of "health"? And can this "knowledge" really be applied globally and fairly? 

Advisor

Liselotte Hermes da Fonseca is born in Helsingoer, Denmark. She studied German language and literature, ethnology, Scandinavian studies, philosophy and art history in Hamburg, Rome and Bologna, got a doctorate in ethnology at the Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg and works now as an editor, author and lecturer.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

Not to know what happens when one communicates something and therefore to question the knowledge again and again – without preventing actions, but in the hope of making them more responsible.

 

Sharing within and across local sustainability initiatives in cities to foster sustainability transformations - Lüneburg 2030+ and beyond

Description

Especially in cities many local initiatives have emerges that aim at fostering a transformation towards sustainability. Sharing plays a key role within many of these initiatives. Besides this sharing “within" a question is how these initiatives already do and could share among each other to increase their impact and enable learning across initiatives. This “sharing across" can comprise: (i) sharing of both physical and organisational resources in a network of initiatives, (i) sharing of experiences, ideas and knowledge as well as (iii) sharing of attitudes, values and intentions contributing to change prevalent paradigms. In this project group you will depart from initiatives that have already started or are planned within the project city of the future Lüneburg 2030+. After exploring the different initiatives, students will develop a vision for sharing in and across the Lüneburg 2030+ initiatives and critically reflect on the role of sharing to foster sustainability in Lüneburg embedded in a globalized world.    

Advisor

Since January 2010 Daniel J. Lang is Professor for Trandisciplinary Sustainability Research at Leuphana University of Lueneburg, Germany, at the Faculty of Sustainability. The main focus of Daniel’s work revolves around the further development of the theoretical, methodological as well as process-related foundations of Sustainability Science. In particular his professorship focuses on cooperation and mutual learning processes between different scientific disciplines as well as science and society with the aim to develop robust solution options for urgent sustainability problems of the 21st century. Daniel has been leading several collaborative sustainability science projects both engaging in transformational sustainability research as well as analyzing this and similar research approaches from a meta-perspective.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

For me sharing in a globalized world means appreciating and sharing of ideas, knowledge, experiences, worldviews as well as solution options to collectively address substantial challenges of the 21st century and contribute to a just and sustainable future.

Sustainable tourism

Description

As we all share this planet, the modern tourism Industry connects people from everywhere in the world with its natural and cultural spots. Even though the damage this industry has caused to local environments is often disastrous, many local communities hope for the economic opportunities coming with the tourists. In this project, we want to discover, which aspects need to be adapted to tourism to protect social and natural Environments instead and enhance other aspects of sustainable development.

Advisor

Since January I am part of the Minor Sustainability Science and responsible for the strand of sustainable consumption. After a study semester at the UFC in Brazil, I further became interested in the impact of tourism on the environment, as well as the local economy and culture. When thinking about "Sharing in a Globalized World", tourism can help to show that we are also sharing this world as a whole.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

Sharing in a Globalized World means to value personal relationships and trust more than the possession of objects.

The role of public perceptions in the ongoing 'Energiewende'

Description

To what extent are publics on board with the ongoing Energiewende? Germany and the rest of the industrialised world needs to eliminate energy-related greenhouse gas emissions as soon as possible. Replacing and reducing use of fossil fuels is a major challenge and is happening too slowly. In this project you will learn about public perceptions of energy and why this matters.

Advisor

Prof Dr Paul Upham is Chair of Human Behaviour and Sustainable Development in INFU, the Institute of Environmental and Sustainability Communication. His research focuses on the roles of individuals in system change, particularly relating to energy. He uses perspectives from sociotechnical sustainability transitions, social psychology and sociology.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

This phrase doesn't have an immediate meaning for me. Globalisation and sharing do not strike me as being from the same frame. I think of sharing as something that individuals do with those with whom they have strong ties, most often family and friends. I don't think of sharing as something that states or corporations do, at least without consideration of self-interest: when collective entities share, they do so for mutual benefit. I also think of sharing as voluntary and in relatively near time frames, whereas sustainability challenges demand greater equity geographically and temporally. Overall I think that sustainability requires stronger international institutions, regulation and enforcement capabilities, as well as a re-orienting of market incentives, such that investing in environmental and social goods is profitable and consuming less is not economically problematic. Sharing is a good starting point for thinking about these things, but for me it is a problematic frame.