#Shared_Narratives

Narrative can be conceived as the telling (in whatever medium, though especially language) of a series of temporal events in order to tell a meaningful story (Kerby 1991). Oftentimes a group of people share the same understanding of a series of events - sharing a common narrative. When thinking through #sharednarratives, think about the way in which you and those around you share the same ways of organizing, presenting and remembering information, and knowing the world. Technology also helps create (for better or for worse) a globalised shared narrative of a number of social concepts such as a shared understanding of the “good life,” of partnership, of family, or of the future itself.

Pau­la Bi­al­ski, known to some as “the ha­cker-whi­s­pe­rer," pri­des her­s­elf in her sharp skill of be­fri­en­ding all sorts of tech­ni­cal­ly-sav­vy nerds, which she has suc­cess­ful­ly done du­ring her eth­no­gra­phic stints with hip­pie back­pa­cker-and-couchsur­fing ha­ckers in Mon­tre­al or, more re­cent­ly, map­ping and na­vi­ga­ti­on cor­po­ra­te ha­ckers in Ber­lin. At Leu­pha­na, she can be found co-co­or­di­na­ting the Di­gi­tal Me­dia BA pro­gram whi­le at the same time tou­ring and com­po­sing with the in­credi­b­ly-fa­mous-in-Po­land in­die pop sen­sa­ti­on, Pau­la & Ka­rol. 

Here you can find all project themes which belong to #SharedNarratives. Please scroll further down to see all themes and advisors.

Fair and Successful Negotiation

Description

Negotiations often end unfairly. For example, the gender pay gap in Germany is still 20%, adjusted 6%. At the same time, research, practice and politics are dealing with this social problem. In this project you are cordially invited to develop creative and effective ways for fair negotiations.

Advisor

Da­vid Lo­schel­der is a Pro­fes­sor for Economic and Social Psychology. Hi research focuses on human perceptions and behavior in price decisions, negotiations, conflict, as well as success and failure to exert self-control. David is fascinated by the impact of first offers and anchoring effects, the influence of precise versus round numbers, procedural framing, ego depletion, training of self control, social identity processes, smartphone usage, the interplay of posture and power, psycho-physiological measures, and meta-analyses. David is married and father of two daughters (*2013, *2014).

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

We might want to consciously reflect that the phrase starts with the verb „sharing“! We share one planet, one world that becomes increasingly more globalized and that becomes increasingly more destroyed. We need to share with less fortunate others globally and we need to adapt the perspective to share this planet beyond our own generation, our children and grandchildren.

Migration and Identity in a Globalized World

Description

Witnessing increasing rates of migration and global travel, migration has become one of the driving forces of the global economy (Hollifield 2012). Through the lens of social sciences, identity is linked with origin cultural affiliation and mother tongue. Identity develops throughout a life span and requires constant linking work of life, time and content (Keupp 2017). For migrants and people with migrational background, constructing a coherent identity appears to be a special task, as they face the challenge to link often contradicting elements and experiences within their lives (King/Koller 2009).

 Advisor

At senior level in high school, Lea found out that she and her friends Lisa and Leon were the only students in the English-language course to have grown up monolingually. This time in the multicultural school community, as well as one-year stays abroad in the USA, India and Turkey shaped her cosmopolitan and tolerant attitude towards people with a migrant background. After studying environmental sciences (B.Sc.) and educational sciences (M.A.), Lea Gathen now works as a research assistant at the Faculty of Education on the subject of digitization and inclusion of refugees.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

While living in an international community abroad, I experienced the richness in diversity of cultures. For example I worked in a multi-cultural, multi-generational team to organize a festival on the topic of waste and its reduction. I realized, that sharing knowledge among people of different age, color, nation and so forth leads to innovative solutions, especially in the area of global problem solving. Therefore, I feel honored to contribute to the ‚Startwoche 2019‘ as a consultant.

Modern Issues with Age-Old Roots

Description

European and Asian cultures are the subject of interest. The topic of investigation is the dynamic of global knowledge transfer beyond boundaries and its influence on the transformation of culture and society. With contributions of all parties involved we will investigate the formation of trends in national and international contexts that contribute to a globalized society of shared spaces. Part of our journey will envision the cultural transfer of ideas – no time or area excluded – and the migration of objects relating to religion, art, architecture, and science. Their interweaving with and integration into new contexts inspired growth and the formation of new cultural trends. The aim of our work is to understand the pluralistic texture of our culture referred to for defining our identity.

Advisor

Seraphia Heitmann2002 Ph.D. received from Vienna University, Dep. of South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies, studied History of Art, Occidental and Asian art, at Bonn University (2003-2009), worked and lectured at a variety of national and international projects and universities, among others at Center for Ad-vanced Holocaust Studies, US Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington D.C., Kunst- und Aus-stellungshalle der BRD, Bonn,London University, Mumbai University, Copenhagenand Göttingen University, Oxford University,etc., public lectures at the Ekô-Haus,Düsseldorf, round table discussion at Mumbai University, Ramkrishna Bajaj SanskritBhavan, interview with WDR, podium discussion at Museum for East Asian Art, Cologne, with live recording by radio Deutsche Welle, etc. Core theme has been the intercultural discourse between European and Southeast Asian societies. In 2012 she was invited to give the Annual Wilhelm von Pochhammer Lecture, Delhi, with a focus on intercultural relations.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

Translating beyond cultural boundaries, sharing and creating common values.

New ideas of solidarity - no captalism means no solution, too

Description

We try to find new ideas to change our economic order from a social and ecological point of view and perhaps to change it in the end. The focus is therefore on preparing the way for the Community's plans for the future. If it is not capitalism geared to growth and profit maximisation, what can it be instead and how do we begin the change?

Advisor

Still at school I came up with the question: „In which kind of social order do we live and how do we deal wealth and live opportunities fair?“. Getting first work experiences in the metal and electronics industry I became member of the workers union IG Metall and started volunteer work. Five years later (2013) I got the chance to work for IG Metall as a trade union official. Since that day employee-interests became my everyday job. I believe in social change. I am interested to exchange ideas with you and discuss our shared future.

What does "Sharing in a Globalized World" mean to you personally?

Evolve same interests in different boundaries.

 

Sharing culture or imposing culture? The example of human rights’ universalism vs relativism debate

Sharing culture or imposing culture?

Description

Human rights practitioners and academics are used to debate the tension between a universalist conception of human rights, and the claim that different cultures produce different sets of rights that are considered important and worthy of protection. A classic arena of disagreement is women’s rights. So we are going to investigate whether the culture of rights is shared or imposed, universal or local, and what effect does globalisation, widely intended, have on this debate.

Advisor

Alessandra Asteriti is Junior Professor of International Economic Law at Leuphana University and Programme Director of the Human Rights and Governance Master at the Professional School. She has an MA in Ancient History from the University of Rome, an MA in Human Rights from the University of Essex, and an LLM and PhD in International Law from the University of Glasgow.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

I see it as positive exchange and commonality between peoples and cultures, but also a negative spreading of environmental and humanitarian problems, and of forcible uniformity imposed from above. 

Sharing Literature

Description

In the pre-digital age, sharing literature simply meant using libraries, giving people books for their birthday, reading to children. While these activities still exist, sharing literature has now taken on a new dimension: novels, poems and other literary texts can be downloaded freely, people write collaborative literature together, fan fiction is created by "prosumers" (producers and consumers), "shared reading" flourishes, and literature  is shared on bookish social media platforms like BookTube and Bookstagram.  How much of this is instrumentalised by publishers and book sellers? What has happened to the question of copyright? 

Advisor

Emer O'Sullivan, an Irishwoman, is professor for English Literature at Leuphana University Lüneburg. Her research interests are translation, comparative literature, children's literature research.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

Sharing for me means not having to own a car; I'm a proud member of the first generation of Car Sharers

 

Sound & Society

Description

This project group focuses on an understanding of the meaning of sound and music on our society and the way it impacts our ways of being together. We will then specifically focus on the way in which music travels, is shared, and becomes globalised - forming a global uniformity of listening culture. Why is global pop music so centred around western sound? And how can new technologies potentially alter or enforce this homogeneity? 

 Advisor

Paula Bialski, known to some as “the hacker-whisperer," prides herself in her sharp skill of befriending all sorts of technically-savvy nerds, which she has successfully done during her ethnographic stints with hippie backpacker-and-couchsurfing hackers in Montreal or, more recently, mapping and navigation corporate hackers in Berlin. At Leuphana, she can be found co-coordinating the Digital Media BA program while at the same time touring and composing with the incredibly-famous-in-Poland indie pop sensation, Paula & Karol. 

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

Sharing is something we might think as fuzzy, fun and positive, but its also in essence an exclusive act as we share with some and reject others. As a practice it is essentially exclusionary. This exclusion can happen because a) we don’t have enough to share (there is only so much chocolate cake to go around) or b) because we want to share with some and don’t want to share with others. Couchsuring.com, for example, might seem like a nice idea where fun and friendly backpackers open their doors to other friendly strangers, but would you share you couch with somebody homeless? Somebody older than you? Somebody who ‘looks scary’? I urge us all to think about the dark sides of sharing. 

The conditions and limits of hospitality

Description

After the arrival of migrants in search of better living conditions, questions have been put for social and political thought. What does „sharing the planet“ mean? Can hospitality be still considered as an ethical duty like in former times? Since the development of the  nation state during 19th century, obligations towards „strangers“ have been inscribed into the procedures of political deliberation and legislation that determine the social spaces of aliens, residents and citizens. What are the rights of others, and can there be such a thing as „unconditional hospitality“?

Advisor

Dr. Steffi Hobuß is the Aca­de­mic Di­rec­tor of Leu­pha­na Col­le­ge. She has also been Vice Dean for In­ter­na­tio­na­liza­t­i­on at the Fa­cul­ty of Cul­tu­re un­til 2017. She has been teaching phi­loo­so­hy and cul­tu­ral stu­dies at Leu­pha­na Uni­ver­si­ty sin­ce 1996. In 2010/​11, she was vi­sit­ing pro­fes­sor for cul­tu­ral me­mo­ry at Kar­sta­ds Uni­ver­si­tet, Swe­den. She stu­di­ed phi­lo­so­phy, Ger­man lan­gua­ge and li­te­ra­tu­re, his­to­ry, edu­ca­ti­on and so­ci­al psy­cho­lo­gy and com­ple­ted her Dr.phil. in 1994 at Bie­le­feld Uni­ver­si­ty (on Witt­gen­stein about ex­pres­si­vi­ty). Her re­se­arch fiel­ds in­clu­de phi­lo­so­phy of lan­gua­ge, theo­ries of Bil­dung/​hig­her edu­ca­ti­on, phi­lo­so­phy of cul­tu­re, post­co­lo­ni­al theo­ry, gen­der stu­dies, an­ci­ent Greek phi­lo­so­phy.

 

The (post-)colonial view

Description

Starting from Frantz Fanon's much quoted sentence "Look, a negro", from which he developed the theoretical framework of his critique of racism, we want to examine the Western view of Africa as it is still today the mediator of a hierarchical, race-based view of the world and bears discriminatory traits. The gaze is thus by no means an objective, neutral, innocent sensual grasp of the material world, but rather an ideologically colored instrument inherent in a power potential. The gaze is closely linked to representation. People, societies and cultures can be represented in an unworthy and degrading way or become invisible. These processes often take place so unspectacularly that we do not become aware of them and take them over without reflection. In particular, the international movement Black life matters and similar initiatives of Afro-Germans and Black Germans loudly demand a rethinking and decolonization of the gaze. There are many ways to uncover traces of the postcolonial gaze and its effects in our everyday lives: in the visual and linguistic images of tourism advertising, in television series, in cinema films, in fashion photography and the fashion industry, in language, etc. 

Advisor

Ilsemargret Luttmann is a lecturer at Leuphana University. As part of her complementary studies, she offers cultural-theoretical topics related to Africa: urbanisation, tourism, clothing and fashion, film, religion, etc. As a freelance painter, she organizes solo and group exhibitions in Hamburg, Berlin, Hanover, etc. She travels regularly to West and Central Africa. 

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

To answer this question I would transmit it to my African friends from various social-economic backgrounds so that they can give me an idea of what it means to them. What do they want me/us to share with them? So I first of all share the question with those who are concerned.

 

Politics of Participation. Towards new Modes of Participation in a Post-media Era.

Description

How to live together in a post-media era? How to overcome digital nihilism and look for new forms of life and relation? By assuming that forms of participation have dramatically changed in the last decades, this project intends to examine the reasons for these changes. In this connection it will explore historical transformations of capitalism which include the emergence of new forms of subjectivity and of a globalized world, the digital revolution, the collapse of the political institutions of modernity and the rise of new modes of production.

Advisor

Prof. Dr. Roberto Nigro has held the Chair of Philosophy, especially Continental Philosophy, at Leuphana University Lüneburg since 2016. He is researching and teaching in the field of critique, power, public and politics and theories of subjectivity. He is also program director at the Collège International de Philosophie in Paris. He was previously a lecturer at the Zurich University of the Arts. Visiting Professor at EHESS, Paris, Université Paris Ouest Nanterre, École Normale Supérieure (Lyon); Visiting Scholar at Harvard University and Assistant Professor at Michigan State University, American University of Paris and Bari University. 

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

It means that we have to acknowledge the social and relational character of our subjectivity, the fact that everything is always connected to something. Put differently “sharing in a globalized world” is a strong critique of any politics of identity. The identity, be it in the form of nationalism, patriotism, or racism, but also in the form of integralism, ecological localism, or proprietary individualism - without forgetting sexism –denies the social and relational character upon which our historical subjectivity is built. “sharing in a globalized world” means fighting for demolishing walls, borders, and frontiers. 

 

Who are we and how many? Identity. Migration. Resistance

Description

‚Where do you come from?’, many people are asked nowadays. How might it feel to be addressed like this all the time? Is your place of birth your only way of belonging? Why should a Black person not be born in Lüneburg? We explore traces of refugees’, migrants’ or people’s labelled as ‚the others’ resistance against stigmatization and Germanization and ask: Who are we and how many?

Advisor

Simone Borgstede Ph.D. is a university-teacher and activist. Trained as a sociologist and historian, her area of teaching includes Feminist theory in a postcolonial perspective and ‚the refugee’ in the history of political ideas. She has done research on racism, sexism, classism and their intersections. Nowadays, she tries to make space for the actors’ perspectives in her reflections on social activism as squatting or refugee struggles.

What does „Sharing in a Globalized World“ mean to you personally?

For me, sharing time, ideas and resources in everyday live e.g. with my West-African neighbours of whom some are homeless is a treat in a world divided in North and South, rich and poor, Black and white.